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Street art that brightens up commercial buildings around the world

April 19, 2017

Artwork in an industrial site in Lyon, France. Photo: streetartnews.com

Many landlords would prefer the walls of their buildings were kept clean. 

But if these examples are anything to go by there’s a strong argument that large-scale artworks improve the atmosphere of neighbourhoods, making them more inviting.

From silos to carparks to office buildings, this street art is something we could look at everyday.

Office building, Sydney

An office building in Alexandria, Sydney. Photo: supplied. An office building in Alexandria, Sydney. Photo: Supplied

Australia’s most prolific street artist Fintan Magee, who is on Instagram here, paints hyper-realistic murals in former industrial parts of Sydney, around the world and also exhibits in galleries.

This office building at 13 Bowden Street, Alexandria, is decorated with one of Magee’s works and is currently available to lease.  

Disused silos, Sheep Hills

Disused silos in Sheep Hills, Victoria. Photo: siloarttrail.com Disused silos in Sheep Hills, Victoria. Photo: siloarttrail.com

Yarriambiack Shire’s Silo Art Trail in rural Victoria has repurposed a series of disused silos into incredible works of art and the hope is it will bring some more visitors to the bush. This work depicting four Aboriginal elders and a starry sky backdrop is by street artist Adnate, who’s done most of his work with Aboriginal communities across Australia.

Fintan Magee (mentioned above) has also participated in the project, which will have six groups of silos painted by the time its completed.

Hosier Lane, Melbourne

Hosier Lane, Melbourne. Photo: Craig Sillitoe.

Hosier Lane, Melbourne. Photo: Craig Sillitoe.

Anyone who’s heard of Melbourne has most likely heard of Hosier Lane, the city’s graffiti mecca that’s also lined with quintessentially Melbourne bars. What could have been a plain or slightly threatening laneway, is covered in spray paint and posters from local and international artists and packed with tourists. Pieces don’t often last very long before another one goes over the top, adding yet another layer of paint.

Shopping strip, Bristol

Banksy's Queen/Bowie mashup, London. Photo: pinterest. Banksy’s Queen/Bowie mashup. Photo: Pinterest

Arguably one of the world’s most famous street artists, Banksy, is no stranger to a political mural spicing up drab parts of the UK and elsewhere. This 2012 work on the side of a shopping strip in Bristol pays homage to Queen Elizabeth and David Bowie, and is thought to have been done for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

Carpark, Melbourne

Beyonce's pregnancy depicted in Melbourne. Photo: instagram/@lushsux.

Beyonce’s pregnancy depicted on the side of a carpark wall, Melbourne. Photo: Instagram/@lushsux

When singer Beyonce announced she was pregnant street artist lushsux decided to immortalise the moment in a Melbourne carpark. Beyonce posted a stylised photo to Instagram with a veil and surrounded by flowers, which became the platform’s most ‘liked’ post ever. After five days of work lushsux had completed the five-storey mural mimicking it. Lushsux, however, had his Instagram account suspended last year for documenting an ‘inappropriate’ mural of Hillary Clinton.

Pavilion, Paris

Optical illusion by Felice Varini in Paris, France. Optical illusion by Felice Varini in Paris, France. Photo: André Morin

You can only see this artwork if you stand in the exact right spot and put your head in the perfect position. Felice Varini has done a series of optical illusions on existing architecture in Paris, France. This work is outside the Paul-Delouvrier pavilon in La Villette – one of Paris’ largest public parks.

Industrial site, Lyon

Artwork in an industrial site in Lyon, France. Photo: streetartnews.com Artwork in an industrial site in Lyon, France. Photo: streetartnews.com

Street art can be so much more than just graffitied swear words or signatures, as this huge piece shows. Two artists known as Ella and Pitr painted the sleeping figure in a yard next to a railway line in the French city of Lyon.

Office block, Toronto

Artwork on the side of an office block in Toronto. Photo: Canadian Art. Artwork on the side of an office block in Toronto. Photo: Canadian Art

This mural on the side of an eight-storey office block in downtown Toronto, Canada, was painted by Phlegm, an elusive artist with a gross moniker. The piece was funded by public-arts organisation The STEPS Initiative, in collaboration with the City of Toronto’s StreetARToronto program.

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